The Tragedy of Jesus and a Hand Wave

by Rabbi Dr. Nathan Lopes Cardozo

The festivities surrounding the birthday of a Jewish child, by the name of Jesus and his brit mila (circumcision) on the first day of January are really more than surprising. The astonishing fact that one Jewish child seems to be at the center of an unprecedented world affair, in which billions of human beings participate, should make us wonder what this is all about.

Maimonides informs us that there must be more than a little religious meaning to all this. In his Mishne Torah (Hilchot Melachim, 11:4) he states that God caused Jesus to have such a great influence on mankind so that it would become accustomed to the concept of the coming of the real mashiach in the future. The great Rav Avraham Yitschak Kook (1865-1935) even went so far as to call Jesus a man with “awesome personal power and spiritual flow” which was misdirected and led to his confusion and apostasy. (Sefer Derech Hatechia, and his letter of June 29,1913 to the famous scholar, the Ridbaz, Rabbi Yacov David Wilovsky z.l.)

Most astonishing is the recounting in the Talmud of the story how Jesus became an apostate.[1] This passage in the Talmud was once censored by the Church, but is now printed in all the new editions. (See Ma’amar Al Hadpasat haTalmud by R.R.N. Rabbinowicz, 1952, 28 n. 26.)

Our rabbis teach us: Always let the left hand repel and the right hand invite…unlike Rabbi Yehoshua ben Perayah who repulsed Jesus with both hands…When King Janai killed our sages, Rabbi Yeshoshua ben Perayah (and Jesus) fled to Alexandria in Egypt. When peace resumed, Rabbi Shimon ben Shetach sent a message to him: ‘From me (in Yerushalayim), the city of holiness, to you, Alexandria, my sister: “My husband stays in your midst, and I sit forsaken.”’ He (Rabbi Yoshua ben Perayah) arose (to return to Yerushalayim) and went and found himself in a certain inn, where great honor was given to him. He said: ‘How beautiful is this achsanai (inn).’ Thereupon Jesus said to him, ‘Rabbi her eyes are narrow.’ (The word ‘achsania’ can mean ‘inn’ or ‘innkeeper,’ Jesus seems to have thought that Rabbi Yehoshua was speaking about the female innkeeper.) So, Rabbi Yehoshua said to him: “Villain, do you behave yourself like that (looking at women)? He sent out four hundred trumpets and excommunicated him. He (Jesus) came before him and said to him: Receive me (let me repent and accept me.) But he would not acknowledge him.

One day he (Rabbi Yehoshua) while reciting the ‘Shema’ (“Hear Israel”) he (Jesus) came before him. He, (Rabbi Yehoshua) intended to receive him (and forgive him), and he made a sign to him. He (Jesus) thought that he repelled him (thinking that sign was dismissive). He went and hung up a tile and worshipped it. He (Rabbi Yehoshua) said to him: ‘Return,’ but he replied: ‘So I have understood from you that everyone who sins and causes the multitude to sin has no chance to repent.’ (Sanhedrin 107b)

(There is much in this passage which is unclear and probably part of the text has been lost.) Is it suggesting that if Rabbi Yehoshua ben Perayah would have been more tolerant towards Jesus, the latter may not have become an apostate, a false mashiach, and Christianity would not have come about?

Whatever the Talmud may have in mind, one is not able to ignore the fact that it seems to teach us that one erroneous hand wave is enough to start an unprecedented outburst of animosity which may result in a new, false religion or movement.

Ramban notes this in his commentary on the event where Sarai afflicted Hagar, which resulted in an ongoing hatred of Arabs for Jews. (See: Bereshith: 16:5,6.)

The Talmud mentions the same problem in relationship to the Amalekites where it discusses the source for Amalek’s hatred of Jews which was caused by an unnecessary rejection of his mother by our forefathers.(See Sanhedrin 99b.)

In all these cases, a minor mistake resulted in hurting people which caused a lot of anti-Semitism.

In his celebrated work, “Makor Baruch”, the well-known sage Rabbi Baruch haLevi Epstein, (1860-1942) the author of the commentary “Torah Temima” on the Torah, notes that a harsh and erroneous approach to those who stand on the edge of leaving the fold of the Jewish people has led to a great amount of damage. In the tractate, Chagiga (15a) we read the story of Elisha ben Avuyah who, after a certain incident, questioned Jewish Tradition and stopped being religious. As soon as the sages said, “Return, backsliding children’ (Yirmiyahu 3:14) but not Acher. (the other one) [the name they gave Elisha ben Avuyah after he turned away from Judaism]” implying that he could not repent. Elisha then decided to leave his people and Judaism entirely.

Most interesting is the following comment by Rabbi Epstein, “This phenomenon, to our sadness, seems to repeat itself in every generation. Whenever people quarrel over matters related to ideology and faith, and a person discovers that his more lenient opinion is in the minority, all too often—although his original view differed only slightly from the majority, the total rejection he experiences pushes him over the brink. Gradually, his views become more and more irrational and he becomes disgusted with his opponents, their Torah and their practices, forsaking them completely.” (Chapter 13.5.)

Rabbi Epstein goes on to discuss the case of Uriel Da Costa (1585-1630) (a Dutch Sephardi Jew who denied the authenticity of Oral Law) and most possibly the well-known Dutch apostate philosopher of Jewish descent, Baruch Spinoza (1632-1677). He criticizes the religious Jewish leaders of the city of Amsterdam who excommunicated both these men. Concerning Uriel Da Costa he writes “instead of instructing him with love and patience and extricating him from his maze of doubts by showing him his mistake, they disparaged and ridiculed him. They pursued him with sanctions and excommunication, cursing him until he was eventually driven away completely from his people and his faith and ending his life. (Uriel Da Costa committed suicide) in a most degrading fashion.” (For a full treatment of this in relation to Spinoza, see Spinoza, A Life, Steven Nadler, Cambridge, 1999, Chapter 6.)

While Uriel Da Costa did not do permanent damage to Judaism, Spinoza became the father of a major philosophical school which inflicted great harm to the image of Judaism and encouraged in later days anti-Jewish outbursts just as in the case of Jesus and his followers. (See: To Mend the World, Emile Fackenheim, Schocken, 1982, Chapter 2.)

We wonder what would have happened if religious leaders such as Rabbi Yehoshua ben Parayah and the religious leaders of the Amsterdam Portuguese-Spanish Community had shown more patience and tolerance. Perhaps Spinoza would not have created so much animosity, sometimes deliberately misrepresenting Judaism, and Jesus may have stayed in the fold. It would not have led to so much Christian anti-Semitism in later days.

Who would have imagined that one hand, waved nearly two thousand years ago, could ever cause such upheaval even in our own days?

Whatever the answer to these questions are, we should be careful in the way how we deal with people who are contemplating the possibility of leaving the fold. Much could be prevented, and too much is at stake.


Notes:

[1] Several scholars state that the identity of Jeshu in the Talmud as Jesus is in dispute. See, for example, Rabbi Yechiel of Paris in Vikkuah, edited by R. Margoliot, 1920, 16f.

As taken from, https://www.cardozoacademy.org/thoughts-to-ponder/the-tragedy-of-jesus-and-a-hand-wave/

Bilaam, Pontius Pilatus, Jesus and the Jewish Tradition

by Rabbi Dr. Nathan Lopes Cardozo

It is extremely difficult to know whether the stories and observations about Jesus in the Talmud (see Sotah: 43a-b; 47a; Sanhedrin: 47a; Gittin: 56b and 57a) actually refer to the Jesus of the New Testament. Several dates do not correspond, and many other problems exist. Scholars have made the important observation that there is also a very great discrepancy between the picture which emerges from the actual text of the New Testament and the one developed by the church. Even in the New Testament itself there are several readings which do not appear consistent, possibly because of later interpolations.

The observations in the Talmud may therefore quite well refer to the Jesus as projected by the Church and not to those which appear in the New Testament (notwithstanding the inconsistency related to the dating of these stories.)

It is, however, the portrait of Jesus created by the Church which has prevailed as the most common and perhaps the most authoritative one in Western civilization. In its need to separate Christianity from Judaism, the Church went out of its way to rewrite the story of Jesus in such a way that he became a strong opponent of Judaism and above all of Halacha.

A critical reading of the text in the New Testament seems, however, to speak about Jesus as a conservative person who was little interested in starting a new religion. Scholars are of the opinion that neither was he looking for ways to undermine the Halacha as his disciple Paul was. His statements concerning divorce do not support the view that he opposed divorce entirely as was stated by the Church (See, for example, Matthew, 19:9 in comparison with Mark, 10:1-12) In fact, he seems to adhere to the view of Beth Shamai that a man is only allowed to divorce his wife when she has committed adultery! (Mishna, Gittin: 9:10) Nor does the well-known incident where he permitted his disciples to pluck ears of grain on Shabbat prove that he favored Shabbat desecration. The text seems to indicate that it may have been a case of sakanath nefashoth, danger of life. (See Mark, 2:23-28) (For another halachic explanation, see Professor David Flusser, Jesus, page 58, The Magnes Press, the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 1998)

It may also be suggested that he was not always consistent in his views or perhaps an “am ha’aretz”, a man with little knowledge of the Halacha, lacking an in-depth knowledge of the Torah. To account for the instances in which Jesus is quoted as having spoken against Halachic standards, scholars seem to agree that this is due to later “reworking” of the original texts. (See David Flusser, ibid, chapters 1 and 4.)

This may explain why several rabbis of world renown had a much more positive attitude towards Jesus (although they completely rejected the claim that he was the mashiach) than the talmudic texts seem to indicate.

A most remarkable and surprising statement is found in the preface to “Seder Olam” by the famous halachic authority, Rabbi Yacov Emden (“Yavetz,” 1697-1776):

The founder of Christianity conferred a double blessing upon the world. On the one hand, he strengthened the Torah of Moshe and emphasized that it is eternally binding. On the other hand, he conferred favor upon the gentiles in removing idolatry from them, imposing upon them stricter moral obligations than are contained in the Torah of Moshe. (sic!) There are many Christians of high qualities and excellent morals. Would that all Christians would live in conformity with their precepts. They are not enjoined, like the Israelites to observe the laws of Moshe, nor do they sin if they associate other beings with God. They will receive a reward from God for having propagated a belief in Him among the nations that never heard his name: For He looks into the heart.

On the other hand, it is worthwhile mentioning a controversial Midrash which is rather uncomplimentary of Jesus. On the verse: “There arose no other prophet in Israel like Moshe, who knew God face to face.” (Devarim 34:10) the Sages commented with a most unusual observation: “In Israel none arose, but among the gentiles one did arise. And who was that? Bilaam, son of Peor.” (Sifri ad loc).

Since it is unthinkable that this statement suggests that Bilaam ever rose to the level of Moshe Rabenu, several commentators make the point that the gentiles had someone whose function with regard to the nations of the world was similar to that of Moshe in Israel. Moshe was the great halachic legislator, and the gentiles also had a man who received that kind of authority in their eyes, and that was Bilaam.

While there is no allusion to this to be found in the Torah text, the Midrash quotes a verse from Bilaam’s words in his blessing of the Jewish people: “God is not a man that He should lie” (Bamidbar 23:19).

To this the Midrash Tanchuma (in uncensored printings) adds: “Bilaam foresaw that a man born from a woman would arise and would proclaim himself a god. Therefore, Bilaam’s voice was given the power to inform the gentiles: “Do not go astray after this man, God is not a man, and if he (this man) says he is God, he is lying.” In that sense Bilaam became a “legislator” towards the gentiles warning them for believing in Jesus as the son of God.

Even more interesting is an Aggada in Sanhedrin 106b where a sectarian asked one of the sages: “Do you know how old Bilaam was when he died?” He replied: “It is not actually stated, but since it is written: ‘Bloody and deceitful men shall not live out half their days’ (Tehilim 55:24) he must have been 33 or 34.” He rejoined and said: “You have spoken well. I personally have seen Bilaam’s chronicle in which it is stated Bilaam, the lame, was 33 years old when Pinchas the ‘Lista’a’ killed him.”

What is Bilaam’s chronicle? There is no such book known, but, as one of the later Jewish writers (Geiger) suggested, it may allude to Jesus. The latter died when he was 33 years old and was killed by Pontius Pilatus. The name Pinchas Lista’a may well be corruption of Pontius Pilatus. In that case, the chronicles may refer to Jesus’ death.

Remarkable to say the least!

As taken from, https://us11.campaign-archive.com/?e=ea5f46c325&u=001429d2ea98064eb844c6bf8&id=cf4b28ed92

God’s False Accusations and the Mystery of this World

by Rabbi Dr. Nathan Lopes Cardozo

“We must believe in freedom of will, we have no choice.” This observation made by Isaac Bashevis Singer introduces one of the greatest problems in Jewish and general philosophy, freedom of will versus determinism. Many have attempted to solve the problem, but not one philosopher has been able to come up with a completely satisfactory response.

In Midrash Tanchuma, we read one of the most daring statements ever made in religious literature. It is a most telling example of the boldness of our sages, who were not afraid to deal with a problem “head on.”

On the words, “And Joseph was brought down to Egypt,” (Bereshith 39:1) the Midrash comments, “This is what is referred to when it says in Tehilim, (66:5) ‘Come and see the works of God. He is terrible in His dealing “allila” with men.’”

On the surface, this verse seems to express a general Jewish belief, which teaches man about the greatness of God. However, it is clear that the Midrash realizes that the expression, “allila,” is most unconventional, for it continues with the following words:

“Says Rabbi Yehoshua ben Karcha, ‘Even those events which You bring upon us, You bring with “allila.” Before God created the world, He created the Angel of Death on the first day.’ From where do we know this? Said Rabbi Barchiah, ‘Because it is written, (when the creation had just started) “there was darkness upon the face of the deep.” This is a reference to the Angel of Death who darkens the face of all creatures. The human being was created on the sixth day and an “allila” was placed before him so that the human being would bring death upon the world as it is written, “And on the day that you will eat from it (i.e. the Tree of Knowledge) you will surely die.” (Bereshit 2:17)

This means that from the outset it was determined that Adam and Eve would be forced to eat from the tree, because they had to be mortal since God had already created the necessity for death.’”

It now becomes clear what the word “allila,” according to the midrash means: false accusation, pretext or insidiousness. Yet, according to the plain text of the Torah, death came on the human being because Adam chose to eat from the tree.

In case we may have any doubt about the correctness of this interpretation, let us read the continuation of this Midrash in which the following analogy is brought:

“To what can we compare this case? To a man who wished to divorce his wife. Before he went home, he wrote a Get (bill of divorce) and entered the house with the Get in his pocket. He then sought an “allila” to give it to her. He told her, ‘Pour me a cup that I may drink.’ She poured it for him. When he took the cup from her, he said, ‘Here is your Get.’ She said to him, ‘What did I do wrong?’ He said, ‘Go out of my house because you poured for me a lukewarm cup.’ Said she to him, ‘Did you already know that I would pour for you a lukewarm cup, so that you wrote a Get and brought it in your hand?’ So Adam said to the Holy One blessed be He, ‘Lord of the universe, before You created the world ,the Torah was with You for 2,000 years (i.e. eternally). You wrote in the Torah about “a man who dies in a tent” (Bamidbar 19:14), and now you come to accuse me that I brought death to the world!!”

The midrash continues in a similar vein, telling of the case of Moshe and the waters of “meriba,” (Bamidbar 20) where it proves from the text that this sin was already determined long before Moshe made this mistake so that he should die on account of it—still, Moshe is blamed for having brought about his own death! The third example brought by the Midrash relates to Joseph and the exile in Egypt. In Bereshith, (15:13) we read that Avraham is told by God, ‘Know for sure that your descendants will be aliens in a land which is not theirs and will be slaves and oppressed for four hundred years.’ Therefore God brought the entire affair of Jacob and his sons, the jealousy and the hatred between the brothers and Joseph, the sale of Joseph, his elevation to his high office in Egypt and, ultimately, the coming of Yacov and his sons to Egypt, in order to fulfill what He had said to Avraham.”

In other words: Why should the brothers be blamed for having caused all this to happen when, in fact, the whole outcome was already decided in advance?! Therefore: It is an “allila” upon man!

Those who study these narratives very carefully will realize, however, that the Midrash was not forced to give this interpretation. It could have allowed for an explanation which would be much more open to freedom of will. Therefore we must conclude that it deliberately took this route to emphasize the paradox of freedom of will versus determinism and to teach us an important lesson. When Jews declare, “Hakol min hashamaim chutz me-yirath shamaim, everything is from heaven (determinism) except the fear of Heaven (freedom of will),” they pronounce a most profound condition of Jewish belief. It is not that there are times when determinism operates and other times when freedom of will is given to man. Rather, they function simultaneously.

On one level, the human being seems to have the opportunity to chose, however, on a different level, all is pre-determined. This is one of the great paradoxes of human existence. It was Friedrich Durenmatt who once said that “he who confronts himself with the paradoxical, exposes himself to reality.” (“21 Points,” The Physicists, 1962)

God who is beyond time and space, is the source of all what happens and so uses false accusations, pretexts, and insidiousness against  human beings while teaching them   simultaneously that they are free to act and that they carry full responsibility for their deeds.

How disturbing! Only God seems to know how this works!  It is one of the great mysteries of this world!

As taken from, https://www.cardozoacademy.org/thoughts-to-ponder/gods-false-accusations-and-the-mystery-of-this-world/

How Fate Guides the Course of History

by Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks

The story of Joseph and his brothers, spread over four parshiyot, is the longest and most tightly-scripted of all the narratives in the Torah. Nothing is there by accident; every detail counts. One moment, however, seems gloriously irrelevant — and it is this that contains one of the most beautiful of the Torah’s ideas.

With great speed, we are introduced to the broad lines of the story. Joseph is envied and hated by his brothers. So deep has the animosity gone that they cannot talk peaceably with one another. Now the brothers have left home to tend their sheep, and Jacob tells Joseph to go and see how they are doing. This encounter will set in motion the central drama from which all else will follow: the moment when the brothers sell Joseph into Egypt as a slave.

But it nearly didn’t happen. Joseph arrived at Shechem where he expected his brothers to be, but they were not there. He might well have wandered around for a while and then, failing to find them, gone home. None of the events that take up the rest of the Torah would have happened: no Joseph the slave, no Joseph the viceroy, no storage of food during the years of plenty, no descent of Joseph’s family to Egypt, no exile, no slavery, no exodus. The entire story — already revealed in broad outlines to Abraham in a night vision — seemed about to be derailed.

Then we read the following:

A man found [Joseph] wandering around in the fields and asked him, “What are you looking for?” He replied, “I’m looking for my brothers. Can you tell me where they are grazing their flocks?” “They have moved on from here,” the man answered. “I heard them say, ‘Let’s go to Dothan.’” So Joseph went after his brothers and found them near Dothan. (Gen. 37:15-17)

I know of no comparable passage in the Torah: three verses dedicated to an apparently trivial, eminently forgettable detail of someone having to ask directions from a stranger. Who was this unnamed man? And what conceivable message does the episode hold for future generations, for us? Rashi says he was the angel Gabriel. Ibn Ezra says he was a passer-by. Ramban however says that “the Holy One, blessed be He, sent him a guide without his knowledge.”

I am not sure whether Ramban meant without Joseph’s knowledge or without the guide’s knowledge. I prefer to think both. The anonymous man — so the Torah is intimating — represented an intrusion of providence to make sure that Joseph went to where he was supposed to be, so that the rest of the drama could unfold. He may not have known he had such a role. Joseph surely did not know. To put it as simply as I can: he was an angel who didn’t know he was an angel. He had a vital role in the story. Without him, it would not have happened. But he had no way of knowing, at the time, the significance of his intervention.

The message could not be more significant. When heaven intends something to happen, and it seems to be impossible, sometimes it sends an angel down to earth — an angel who didn’t know he or she was an angel — to move the story from here to there. Let me tell the story of two such angels, without whom there might not be a State of Israel today.

One was a remarkable young woman from a Sephardi family who, at the age of 17, married into the most famous Ashkenazi family in the world. Her name was Dorothy Pinto; her husband was James de Rothschild, son of the great Baron Edmond de Rothschild who did so much to support the settlement of the land in the days before the proclamation of the State.

A critical juncture occurred during World War I that would eventually lead to the defeat of the Ottoman Empire and the placing of Palestine under a British mandate. Suddenly, Britain became absolutely central to the Zionist dream. A key figure in the Zionist movement, Chaim Weizmann, was in Britain, experimenting and lecturing in chemistry at Manchester University. But Weizmann was a Russian immigrant, not a prominent member of British society. Manchester was not London. Chemistry was not politics. The most influential and well-connected Jewish family was the Rothschilds. But Edmond was in France. James was a soldier on the battlefield. And not every member of the British Rothschilds was a Zionist.

At that moment, Dorothy suddenly assumed a leading role. She was only 19 when she first met Weizmann in December 1914, and understood very little of the political complexities involved in realizing the Zionist dream. But she learned quickly. She was perceptive, resourceful, energetic, delightful, and determined. She connected Weizmann with everyone he needed to know and persuade. Simon Schama, in his definitive account of Two Rothschilds and the Land of Israel, says that “young as she was … she combined charm, intelligence, and more than a hint of steely resolution in just the right mixture to coax commitment from the equivocal, enthusiasm from the lukewarm, and sympathy from the indifferent.”

His judgement on the effect of her interventions is that “through tireless but prudent social diplomacy she had managed to open avenues of influence and persuasion at a time when they were badly needed.” The result, in 1917, was the Balfour Declaration, a milestone in the history of Zionism — and we should not forget that the Declaration itself took the form of a letter to Lord (Walter) Rothschild.

Dorothy’s husband James, in his will, left the money to build the Knesset, Israel’s parliament building. In her own will, Dorothy left the money to build a new Supreme Court building, a project undertaken by her nephew Jacob, the current Lord Rothschild. But of all the things she did, it was those connections she made for Chaim Weizmann in the years 1914 to 1917 that were surely the most important. Without them, there might have been no Balfour Declaration and no State of Israel.

The other figure, who could not have been less like Dorothy de Rothschild, was Eddie Jacobson. The son of poor Jewish immigrants, born in New York’s Lower East Side, he moved with his family to Kansas City where he met a young man called Harry Truman. They knew one another in their youth and became close in 1917, when they underwent military training together. After the end of World War I, they opened a haberdashery business together. It failed in 1922 because of the recession.

From then on, they went their separate ways, Jacobson as a traveling salesman, and Truman as successively a county administrator, senator, vice president, and then, when President Roosevelt died in office in 1945, president of the United States. Despite their very different life-trajectories, the two stayed friends, and Jacobson would often visit Truman, talking to him about, among other things, about the fate of European Jewry during the Holocaust.

After the war, the position of America vis-à-vis the State of Israel was deeply ambivalent. The State Department was opposed. Truman himself refused to meet Chaim Weizmann. On March 13, 1948, Jacobson went to the White House and persuaded Truman to change his mind and meet Weizmann. Largely as a result of this, the United States became the first nation to grant diplomatic recognition to Israel on May 14, 1948.

Many years later, Truman wrote:

One of the proudest moments of my life occurred at 6:12 p.m. on Friday, May 14, 1948, when I was able to announce recognition of the new State of Israel by the government of the United States. I remain particularly gratified by the role I was fortunate to play in the birth of Israel as, in the immortal words of the Balfour Declaration, “a national home for the Jewish people.”

Two people, Dorothy de Rothschild and Eddie Jacobson, appeared on the scene of history and connected Chaim Weizmann with individuals he might otherwise not have met, among them Arthur Balfour and Harry Truman. They were like the stranger who connected Joseph and his brothers, but with infinitely more positive consequences. I think of them both as angels who did not know they were angels.

Perhaps this is true not only about the destiny of nations but also about each of us at critical junctures in our lives. I believe that there are times when we feel lost, and then someone says or does something that lifts us or points the way to a new direction and destination. Years later, looking back, we see how important that intervention was, even though it seemed slight at the time. That is when we know that we too encountered an angel who didn’t know he or she was an angel. That is what the story of Joseph’s stranger is about.

As taken from, https://www.algemeiner.com/2019/12/17/parshat-vayeshev-how-fate-guides-the-course-of-history/

¿Te cansas de pelear por lo mismo y no poder solucionar el problema?

Image result for couple fighting in black and white
por Becky Krinski

¿Qué haces cuando los gritos, el silencio o la indiferencia te impiden resolver tus conflictos?


¿Cuántas veces puedes pelear por lo mismo y no llegar a nada, o encontrarte con el mismo problema una y otra vez? ¿Qué haces cuando sientes que no te escuchan y si lo hacen, pareciera que no te entienden? ¿Qué sucede cuando parece que ni siquiera tratan de hacer el esfuerzo por ver tu punto de vista y ponerse en tus zapatos?

Los problemas que no se solucionan se pudren, se estancan y con el tiempo empeoran, convirtiéndose en cargas pesadas y fastidiosas y, con cualquier pretexto, resurgen y se repiten, imitando soluciones previamente intentadas que ya se sabe que no han dado un buen resultado.

Sin querer, se reviven heridas pasadas, se repiten los malentendidos y se perpetúan los diálogos rotos.

Con el tiempo, lo único que sucede, es que se pierde la paciencia y se olvidan las razones que nutren, fortalecen e inspiran la relación.

El dilema que impide solucionar los problemas… Si cedes al punto que no sientes que te validan, eventualmente la relación se resiente y se fractura. Pero si te “montas en tu caballo” y no te quieres bajar para tratar de dialogar, el orgullo se enfrasca y aliena, alejando a las personas que quieres.

El secreto entonces radica en encontrar un punto medio. Es decir, uno puede entender, aceptar, escuchar y hacerse responsable de lo que uno hace y no acusar al otro.

No se trata de averiguar quién tiene la razón. Tampoco se busca encontrar culpables o víctimas. Se trata de tener comunicación con empatía, donde se puedan reconocer las necesidades y los sentimientos de todos. Lo ideal sería poder hacer un compromiso común para beneficio de todos o por lo menos con un arreglo que todos puedan vivir sin reprocharse.

Para poder solucionar el problema y dejar de pelear, el primer paso debe ser, reconocer que uno no es perfecto y que desde luego no quiere lastimar, ni causar dolor, pero el otro tampoco es perfecto.

Hay que aprender a escuchar el dolor y lo que pide la otra persona, desde la perspectiva del otro, por más ridículo que esto parezca.

Existen comportamientos que son aceptados y otros que No son aprobados. Queda sobreentendido que las acciones, actitudes y palabras que lastiman o alteran no solucionan nada, por lo tanto, no hay razón para seguir utilizándolas.

Si se repiten las mismas acciones o actitudes, si se repiten los mismos diálogos, la relación no se queda igual. Cada vez que se repite la misma discusión, se llega al problema que no se resolvió antes, la relación se lastima un poco más, se deteriora y no se resuelve nada.

Para salir de ese círculo vicioso, hay que tomar conciencia y ser responsable de las acciones que no sirven y dejarlas de hacer, olvidar el orgullo y aprender a ceder.

La receta: Solucionar viejos problemas

Ingredientes:

  • Responsabilidad – reconocer la importancia de las acciones propias
  • Creatividad y sentido del humor – buscar nuevos puntos de vista, reír e innovar
  • Flexibilidad – aprender a ceder y dar lo mejor de uno para el otro
  • Decisión – Ganas de querer solucionar el problema
  • Respeto – aceptar las diferencias y las necesidades de cada quien

Afirmación positiva:

Soy parte del problema y también soy parte de la solución. Tengo el poder para cambiar mi actitud y mis expectativas, con el fin de poder solucionar los conflictos que me afectan. Poder solucionar mis viejos conflictos me libera, me regala paz y me llena de energía positiva. Tengo fe en que puedo arreglar lo que he lastimado y que puedo ser una mejor persona.

La importancia de resolver los conflictos:

  1. Solucionar los problemas mejora la calidad de vida y promueve la felicidad. Cargar con problemas y discutir más de lo mismo toda la vida, reduce las posibilidades de tener una vida plena y armoniosa.
  2. Eludir los conflictos no significa librarse de ellos. El problema, sigue a pesar de que se le niegue. Al evitarlo, se pierde la paz interna, creando ansiedad y un sentimiento de soledad.
  3. Discutir más de lo mismo, sólo promueve la permanencia del problema y de la soledad. Los sentimientos que no se encauzan, se acumulan hasta que explotan y deshacen el alma de las personas.

“Liberarte de los viejos conflictos es la acción más gratificante y enriquecedora que existe”.

Según tomado de, https://www.aishlatino.com/fm/recetas-para-la-vida/Te-cansas-de-pelear-por-lo-mismo-y-no-poder-solucionar-el-problema.html?s=hp4

Empowering our Present with the Future

Why did our souls come down to earth? Rabbi Shneor Zalman of Liadi prepares us for a never-ending battle.

Many Chassidic discourses open by asking why our souls descended from the highest of the heights to the darkness of this world. Although the discourse will go on to give many good answers, explaining our wondrous mission to “make for God a dwelling place in the lower worlds” and the eternal gain that the souls receive from the descent-for-the-purpose-of-ascent, the next discourse will open with the same question. Apparently, this question is existential and constantly prods at our consciousness.

One of the ways to deal with the questions and difficulties that reality unleashes upon us – so much so that we may experience the words of our Sages, “It would be preferable to a person if he was not created, rather than being created” – is to empower ourselves with belief in God’s goodness. God desires to bestow good upon us. If God, the Good and Bestower of good, has brought us down to this “valley of tears”, then we can rest assured that good results are guaranteed. This applies not only to those who pass the trial with flying colors, but also to those empty people who have few mitzvot and who, on the surface, have done more spiritual harm than good. This experience of the difficulties of this world makes the powerful good promised in the next world more tangible. As our Sages say, “It is worthwhile for a person to endure all the suffering of purgatory in order to merit the pleasure of the World to Come”.

This week we will celebrate the 19th of Kislev, the new year of Chassidut, when tens of thousands will once again begin learning the book, Tanya, by Rabbi Shneor Zalman of Liadi, the Alter Rebbe. The Tanya is the basic book of Chassidut, defined also as “the book of advice for illness of the soul”. The Tanya, the “book of intermediary souls” brings us a sober-minded perspective on reality. The Alter Rebbe writes in his book that “all this world is difficult and evil and the wicked people dominate all the rest”. The ‘intermediary’ person can anticipate a life of never-ending struggle. As the Alter Rebbe asks, “If so, why did their souls descend to this world to exert themselves for nothing, God forbid, and to battle their evil inclination all their days and they cannot overcome it?”

Nonetheless, the Alter Rebbe comforts the ‘intermediaries’, guides them as to how to achieve joy in the purpose of creation and how to draw strength to serve God. The very name of the Book of Tanya holds the answer and a promise. In Hebrew, Tanya (תניא) is an anagram for Eitan (איתן). Tanya reveals the Eitan of the soul.

In the Bible, the word Eitan means hard-assertive and also ancient-primal. The Eitan of the soul is the essential, primal, root of the soul, whose wholeness is not sullied by the tribulations of reality, the crucible of our psyches and our human failings. It promises that nobody will ever be lost or pushed away from God. This is a constant, powerful point that exists in the heart of every Jew. It gives him the strength to withstand difficulties and to serve God in any situation. It promises that ultimately, he will successfully negotiate the path and fulfill his life’s mission.

How do we reveal this primal point of power?  In Hebrew, the four letters of the word Eitan: alef, yud, tav, nun, are the four letters that we use to designate a word in the future tense (I will, he will, you will, we will). This alludes to the fact that the full revelation of the Eitan in the soul will be in the future. Thus, Eitan Ha’ezrachi, (Eitan the citizen) mentioned in Psalms, is, on the one hand, a local citizen from time immemorial (his tenure makes him well-based and assertive) and on the other hand, he will shine in the future (Ezrach also means “I will shine”). The revelation of our Eitan depends upon our ability in the present to affix our souls to the future good – to our faith and trust in God. While still experiencing the difficulties of life, the Eitan opens a skylight to the power of the good that will be revealed through our faith and trust in God’s goodness. This faith and trust reveal that this powerful good is concealed in our souls and is available as a source of strength – even in the present.

Projecting this “new light that will shine on Zion” from the future to the present is expressed by the original Torah thoughts that flow from “the new Torah that will go out from Me”, which will be revealed in the days of the Mashiach. The new, revolutionary, sweetening quality of all the Chassidic teachings heals and strengthens the soul. It exposes it to a new perspective on the ancient Torah – to a new light on the Torah of redemption.

As taken from, https://www.inner.org/chassidut/empowering-our-present-with-the-future

Un Judaísmo “Nervioso”

Image result for jacob and esau wrestling

¿Cuál es la enseñanza para nosotros del cambio de nombre de Jacob?

por Eliezer Shemtov

La conferencia rabínica en el Hotel Sofitel se había terminado y los rabinos se fueron para el aeropuerto.

“¿Y nuestras propinas?” preguntaron los mozos al Maitre.

“No sé. Estos judíos…..”

Al rato ven que dos de los rabinos vuelven. “No les vamos ayudar en nada,” dijeron todos.

El rabino principal se acerca al Maitre y dice: “Mirá, nos confundimos con la propina. Cuando llegué al aeropuerto y abrí mi bolso para sacar mi pasaporte, vi el sobre. Pensé que mi colega ya se lo había entregado. La verdad es que estamos muy agradecidos por el servicio. Les doy aquí USD100 de propina a cada uno.”

“Muchas gracias,” dijo el Maitre. “No sé si será verdad o no lo que me enseñaron en la escuela que mataron a nuestro dios. Pero de que lo hicieron sufrir, de eso estoy seguro.”

En la lectura bíblica de esta semana1 leemos sobre el encuentro de los hermanos Jacob y Esaú luego de 36 años de no haberse visto. Jacob iba al encuentro buscando aplacar la ira de su hermano mientras que Esaú vino a recibirlo con 400 hombres de guerra. Al final, en vez de atacar a Jacob, lo abrazó y lo besó.

La pelea con el ángel de Esaú

La Torá nos cuenta como la noche previa al encuentro, Jacob cruzó el río Iabok con toda su familia, ganado y bienes. Volvió a buscar unos pequeños jarrones y un hombre (que era, en realidad, el ángel protector de Esaú) lo atacó y se pelearon hasta que subió el alba. Cuando quiso irse, Jacob no lo dejó irse hasta que no lo bendijera. Lo bendijo con que en lugar de llamarlo Jacob, que implica que obtuvo las bendiciones de su padre por medio del engaño, se iba a llamar Israel que implica que peleó con ángeles y con hombres y los venció.

Resulta que durante la pelea el ángel le había tocado la articulación de la cadera, descolocándola, cosa que lo dejó rengo a Jacob. Como consecuencia de este episodio no comemos el nervio ciático hasta el día de hoy2 .

En la práctica, como consecuencia de no comer el nervio ciático abstenemos de comer toda la parte trasera del animal ya que es muy difícil sacar el nervio ciático que es un nervio muy largo y muy ramificado. Hay ciertas comunidades que mantienen una tradición milenaria en cuanto a la extracción del nervio ciático, y, luego de sacarlo, se permite comer la carne de la parte trasera del animal. Es una tarea muy engorrosa y costosa y generalmente se vende toda la parte trasera para el mercado no Kosher.

¿Cuál es la razón de este precepto?

El Séfer HaJinuj3 lo explica de la siguiente manera:

“De las raíces de este precepto es para que sea una señal para el pueblo judío que a pesar de sufrir muchas tribulaciones en los diversos exilios a manos de los pueblos y los descendientes de Esaú, tengan la seguridad de que no se van a destruir sino que perdurarán por siempre y vendrá un redentor y los redimirá de las manos del opresor.

“Al recordar siempre este tema por medio del cumplimiento de este precepto que servirá de recordatorio, perdurarán en su fe y comportamiento justo eternamente.

“El vínculo entre los hechos se debe al hecho que aquel ángel que peleó con nuestro patriarca Jacob, que sabemos por nuestra tradición que fue el ángel guardián de Esaú, quiso eliminar a Jacob y sus descendientes del mundo y no pudo, y lo hizo sufrir al tocarle la articulación de la cadera. De la misma manera, los descendientes de Esaú hacen sufrir a los descendientes de Jacob, y al final se redimirán de ellos como encontramos con el padre (Jacob) que el sol le amaneció para curarlo y se salvó del dolor. Así amanecerá el sol del Mashíaj para nosotros y nos curará de nuestro sufrimiento y nos redimirá rápidamente en nuestros días, Amén.”

Las enseñanzas jasídicas explican que el mensaje de este precepto es el tema de la Providencia Divina que nos acompaña en todos los detalles de la vida. Es por eso que se conmemora este hecho histórico por medio de algo muy específico como no comer el nervio ciático, en vez de algo más general.

Jacob e Israel

¿Cuál es la enseñanza para nosotros del cambio de nombre de Jacob?

En el caso del cambio de nombre de Avraham y Sará (en lugar de Avram y Sarai), los nombres nuevos desplazaron totalmente a los nombres originales y nunca más aparecen en la Torá con los nombres originales. En el caso de Jacob, en cambio, encontramos que retuvo el nombre original y a veces es llamado Jacob aún después del cambio de nombre a Israel.

¿A qué se debe?

Una de las explicaciones es la siguiente:

Tanto lo representado por el nombre Jacob como lo representado por el nombre Israel siguen teniendo lugar en la vida del pueblo judío en general y la vida de cada judío en particular.

Jacob implica “engaño” como también “talón”. Israel implica dominio, tanto sobre lo material (hombres) como también sobre lo espiritual (ángeles).

La idea que esto engloba es muy interesante. En cuanto a lo espiritual somos “Israel”; en cuanto a lo material somos “Jacob”. O sea, nuestro vínculo con lo material es uno de “engaño”. Nos “disfrazamos” de materialistas, cuando en realidad el objetivo es espiritual, elevar al mundo material a un nivel superior espiritual. Comemos para tener la fuerza de servir a D-os y de esa manera elevar el mundo mineral, vegetal y animal que nos sostiene. En cuestiones espirituales, en cambio, el vínculo es transparente: estudiamos Torá para lograr la conexión espiritual que proporciona y no para tener un beneficio en el plano material.

También: “Israel” representa aquel que está consustanciado y orgulloso de su condición de judío; “Jacob” representa aquel que le da vergüenza y se “agarra del talón” de su hermano, Esaú.

La edad de Bar Mitzvá

Luego del encuentro con Esaú, Jacob se asentó con su familia en la ciudad de Shjem. Ahí sufrió la violación de su hija, Dina, por medio del príncipe del lugar, Shjem ben Jamor. Los dos hijos de Jacob, Shimón y Levi, matan a espada a todos los hombres de la ciudad por su complicidad. Su padre, Jacob, los rezonga.

De acuerdo a la cuenta que podemos sacar a partir de los versículos, tanto Shimón como Levi tenían en ese momento trece años. La Torá se refiere a los dos como hombres: “agarró cada hombre su espada”4 . De ahí aprendemos que uno, al llegar a la edad de trece años se considera “hombre” y es responsable por sus acciones.

¿Por qué la Torá nos enseña este dato por medio de un episodio tan sangriento?

El Rebe lo explica de la siguiente manera:

Si bien Jacob criticó a sus hijos por cómo hicieron lo que hicieron, sin haberle consultado primero, lo que nos sirven de ejemplo positivo es el atributo de no quedarse indiferente ante las injusticias. Si bien lo que hicieron fue criticable, el hecho de reaccionar y querer hacer algo al respecto es lo que define al hombre judío: Manifiesta una sensibilidad madura en lugar de la inconsciencia de la niñez.

Notas al Pie

1. Génesis 32:4 – 36:43

2. ibid, 32:33

3. Libro publicado en el siglo XIII que trae motivos por cada uno de los 613 preceptos.

4. Génesis, 34:25

Según tomado de, https://es.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/2777359/jewish/Un-Judasmo-Nervioso.htm

¿Quién quiere ser judío?

Iaacov se lo sigue llamando “Iaakov” en la Torá, aunque también es llamado por su nuevo nombre, “Israel”

por Yanki Tauber

Esta semana leímos (en Génesis 32) como Iaacov adquiere un nuevo nombre, “Israel”, después de descansar durante la noche con un ángel que representaba el espíritu de Esav. “Ya no será Iaacov tu nombre”, proclamó el ángel derrotado, “sino Israel, porque has luchado con Di-s y con los hombres, y has vencido”.

Y aun así, a Iaacov se lo sigue llamando “Iaakov” en la Torá, aunque también es llamado por su nuevo nombre, “Israel”; desde este punto en adelante, la Torá alterna entre los dos nombres. Lo mismo pasa con el pueblo judío en su conjunto: nosotros somos generalmente llamados “Israel” o los “Hijos de Israel”, pero también hay muchos lugares de la Torá donde se nos llama, como colectivo, “Iaakov” o “La simiente de Iaakov”.

Los maestros jasídicos señalan que el nombre Iaacov se usa cuando nos referimos a nosotros mismos como “sirvientes” de Di-s (como en Ieshaiahu 44:1: “Ahora, escucha, mi sirviente Iaakov”), mientras que el nombre Israel es utilizado al hablar de nosotros como como “hijos” de Di-s (como en Éxodo 4:22: “Mi primer hijo, Israel”).

La diferencia entre un sirviente y un hijo puede ser entendida en muchos niveles. La mayor distinción es, sin embargo, lo que motiva la relación. Ambos, un hijo y un sirviente, sirven al padre/amo y cumplen su voluntad. La diferencia está en por qué lo hacen. Cuando un hijo hace algo por su padre o su madre, lo hace por amor, placer y alegría. El sirviente, por otro lado, no lo hace porque quiere, sino porque debe.

Esta diferencia afecta la calidad de la relación en todo sentido. Mientras el “hijo” y el “sirviente” hacen técnicamente las mismas cosas, hay una enorme diferencia en la naturaleza, la calidad y el impacto de la acción si está hecha con amor y deseo o porque uno se siente forzado a hacerla.

Estos prototipos —el “hijo” y el “sirviente”— existen en todos los tipos de relaciones: en el matrimonio, en la familia, en el trabajo, etc. Hasta puede haber un hijo que en sus sentimientos y acciones hacia sus padres se parezca más a un sirviente, o un sirviente cuyos servicios a su amo se comparen con los de un hijo, por su amor y deseo.

En nuestras vidas como judíos y en nuestra relación con Di-s también existen estos dos prototipos. Nuestro judaísmo puede ser el judaísmo de un “sirviente”: el de alguien que no tiene opción en el asunto y simplemente acepta el hecho de que esto es lo que es y este es su deber. O podemos ser “hijos” de Di-s y regocijarnos en el rol, desearlo, celebrarlo y disfrutar de ello.

El “espíritu de Esav” con el que todos nosotros luchamos es nuestro yo material. Es la parte de nosotros que sólo quiere ser como todos los demás: ganarse la vida y transcurrirla con la menor dificultad posible. Es la parte de nosotros que “acepta” nuestro judaísmo como algo impuesto: hacemos nuestra parte, pero sin el amor, la alegría ni el deseo que conllevan hacer algo que realmente queremos hacer.

Esta es nuestra personalidad “Iaakov”: aquella parte de nosotros que aún lucha con el espíritu de Esav. Pero cada uno de nosotros tiene momentos de triunfo sobre el ángel del materialismo y la apatía. Momentos en los que hasta crecemos ser nuestro propio “Israel”: el nosotros que se regocija en nuestra relación con Di-s y en el rol especial que Di-s nos dio como judíos. Momentos en los que experimentamos nuestra mitzvá no como un deber, sino como un acto de amor y satisfacción personal.

Pero la Torá sabe que no es simplemente cuestión de vencer al ángel y “graduarnos” de nuestra personalidad Iaacov a nuestro yo Israel. Más bien, nos quedamos entre Iaacov e Israel y alternamos entre estos dos modos de nuestro judaísmo. Algunos de nosotros seremos Iaacov la mayor parte del tiempo, mientras que en otros predominará Israel. Pero realmente todos tenemos nuestros momentos Israel, como así también tenemos los momentos en los que volvemos al modo Iaakov.

Esto es porque, incluso después de que Iaacov derrotó al ángel y adquirió el nombre “Israel”, la Torá lo llamó a él —y a nosotros— por ambos nombres. El mensaje tiene doble sentido: en primer lugar, que Di-s valora también nuestro modo Iaacov y aprecia cada buena acción que hacemos, incluso —y quizá especialmente— cuando nos falta la alegría y el deseo y nos forzamos a realizar nuestro deber; y en segundo lugar, que la oportunidad para acceder a nuestro Israel oculto está siempre ahí, así como la de experimentar la alegría y la satisfacción que sentimos al desear y alegrarnos por quiénes somos y por lo que somos, y por nuestra misión en la vida.

Segun tomado de, https://es.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/3520051/jewish/Quin-quiere-ser-judo.htm#utm_medium=email&utm_source=94_magazine_es&utm_campaign=es&utm_content=content

La Declaración Universal de los Derechos Humanos: Una perspectiva judía

Image result for torah scroll

La historia del hombre ha estado salpicada de episodios dramáticos en donde los derechos humanos de individuos y pueblos enteros son y han sido transgredidos sistemáticamente hasta nuestros días. Quizás uno de los grupos que se han caracterizado por haber visto sus más elementales prerrogativas conculcadas a lo largo de toda su existencia es el pueblo judío. Diversidad de factores han incidido para que en casi todas las latitudes y en todos los tiempos se haya legislado en contra de esta minoría, que ha sido víctima de la discriminación y de la marginación.

A pesar de que con los movimientos liberales de los últimos siglos se intentó restaurar a los judíos tanto sus derechos individuales como colectivos, las primeras décadas del Siglo XX evidenciaron lo que casi dos milenios de intolerancia fueron capaces de concebir, la bestia nazi que llevó a cabo en forma fría y calculada el genocidio de la tercera parte del pueblo judío.

Esta experiencia colectiva ha hecho al judío sumamente sensible a las cuestiones de los derechos humanos. Muchos de ellos han encabezado movimientos contemporáneos que propugnan por la igualdad del hombre y la justicia social. No es de extrañar, por lo tanto, que haya sido un judío el principal promotor de la Declaración Universal de los Derechos Humanos y que, el Holocausto, haya sido el elemento catalizador que ayudó a cristalizar este transcendental documento ya hace más de sesenta años.

A fines de 1948, los acontecimientos sin precedentes que se suscitaron dentro del contexto de la segunda guerra mundial permanecían latentes en la memoria de la humanidad. Diversos grupos cívicos de las fuerzas aliadas pugnaban porque se adoptaran medidas internacionales que coadyuvaran a salvaguardar los derechos del hombre. Con el derrumbe de las potencias que habían aspirado al dominio universal, muchas naciones en ruinas y pueblos inmersos en la miseria luchaban por vivir con dignidad. La Comisión de los Derechos Humanos de la recién constituida ONU, inició la elaboración de un documento en el que se consagrarían los derechos fundamentales del hombre y a donde se sentarían los principios para que las relaciones entre los pueblos fuesen regidas con justicia y respeto.

El presidente de la Comisión, René Cassin, jurista judío nacido en Bayonne, Francia en 1887, impulsó fuertemente la promulgación de la Declaración Universal de los Derechos Humanos. Desde 1924, después de la primera guerra mundial, Cassin se dedicó a luchar en contra de la injusticia. Fundó una asociación para inválidos de guerra y actuó como un destacado miembro de la resistencia, ocupando el cargo de comisionado para la justicia y la educación. Durante la segunda guerra mundial, muchos de sus familiares perecieron junto con los millones de judíos ejecutados por el aparato nazi. Como testigo de la crueldad humana llevada a su máxima expresión, se sintió especialmente responsable por la cruzada a favor de los derechos humanos que tuvo su culminación en la Declaración.

El diez de diciembre de 1948, la asamblea general de la ONU votó por el reconocimiento y el respeto de este documento histórico ante la actitud de reserva de algunos países del bloque comunista, ya que estos derechos cívicos y políticos resultaban incompatibles con ciertos regímenes autoritarios.

La Declaración constituye el ideal por el que todos los pueblos deben luchar: el amplio respeto a los derechos humanos y a la libertad, asegurando su aplicación universal y efectiva a través de medidas progresivas de carácter nacional e internacional.

Los antecedentes de esta Declaración los podemos encontrar en el Bill of Rights inglés, en la Declaración de Independencia de Estados Unidos y en la promulgación de la Declaración de los Derechos del Hombre defendidos en Francia en el siglo XVIII, todos los cuales se basaban en el concepto del hombre como poseedor de derechos absolutos e inalienables.

A pesar de que este documento es reciente, como concepción política, religiosa y moral, los derechos humanos son muy antiguos y se remontan más allá de los racionalistas franceses y de los colonialistas americanos. Podemos encontrar en la Biblia, por ejemplo, numerosas leyes, máximas y proverbios en donde se refleja la preocupación por los derechos inherentes a todo ser humano.

La idea central parte del libro de Génesis: “Y creó Dios al hombre a su imagen; varón y hembra los creó” (Génesis 1:27). De acuerdo a esta premisa, todo ser humano lleva en su esencia parte de la divinidad y mantiene así, un status de igualdad ante sus semejantes. De aquí se deriva también, que el hombre está dotado de atributos como el sentido de justicia y el libre albedrío, colocando al hombre fuera del determinismo divino.

A través de diversos recursos la Biblia enfatiza la esencia misma del judaísmo: “Amarás a tu prójimo como a ti mismo” (Levítico 19:18). Hillel, uno de los principales sabios judíos se explaya en este aspecto: “Lo que es malo para ti no lo hagas a tus semejantes. Esto es toda la Torá, lo demás es comentario”. (Shabbat, p. 312, Talmud Babli).

Es en la Biblia, también en donde encontramos los fundamentos morales del comportamiento humano con el propósito de preservar la justicia, la libertad y la paz, en el proceso de consolidación de una sociedad armónica. Los Diez Mandamientos (Exodo 20:1-7), pueden considerarse como una filosofía en sí mismos, que aseguran la convivencia entre los hombres a través de preceptos como el de “no matarás”, “no hurtarás”, “no codiciarás”, entre otros.

Estos postulados mantienen su vigencia y universalidad hasta la fecha. Sin embargo, considerando que las condiciones actuales son más complejas, se han tenido que concebir diversas legislaciones sobre derechos humanos que respondan a nuevas circunstancias y que se han visto enriquecidas por los conceptos morales que las anteceden.

En la Declaración se enumeran los derechos propios e inalienables de todo ser humano, los cuales deben ser respetados por todos los países que la suscriben.

A pesar de que en términos jurídicos este documento carece de normatividad, ha tenido un notable impacto moral. Su premisa básica es que todo hombre nace en condiciones de libertad e igualdad de derechos y que al estar dotado de raciocinio y de conciencia, debe buscar la convivencia con sus congéneres. De aquí se derivan las premisas de libertad de pensamiento y de conciencia, independientemente de raza, sexo o religión. Se atribuye, además, vital importancia al derecho de una vida libre y segura, y se subraya la unión esencial de la familia humana.

A más de sesenta años de su promulgación y a pesar de su reconocimiento universal, la humanidad continúa siendo testigo de múltiples casos de discriminación y persecución contra diversas minorías étnicas y religiosas.Día a día se violan los derechos humanos ante la inmovilidad de la comunidad internacional y más aún, con el apoyo de países soberanos que fomentan este flagelo en todos sus aspectos.

Sin embargo, a pesar de todo esto, la Declaración Universal de los Derechos Humanos representa sin lugar a duda un paso trascendental para garantizar la dignidad humana.La historia del hombre ha estado salpicada de episodios dramáticos en donde los derechos humanos de individuos y pueblos enteros son y han sido transgredidos sistemáticamente hasta nuestros días. Quizás uno de los grupos que se han caracterizado por haber visto sus más elementales prerrogativas conculcadas a lo largo de toda su existencia es el pueblo judío. Diversidad de factores han incidido para que en casi todas las latitudes y en todos los tiempos se haya legislado en contra de esta minoría, que ha sido víctima de la discriminación y de la marginación.

A pesar de que con los movimientos liberales de los últimos siglos se intentó restaurar a los judíos tanto sus derechos individuales como colectivos, las primeras décadas del Siglo XX evidenciaron lo que casi dos milenios de intolerancia fueron capaces de concebir, la bestia nazi que llevó a cabo en forma fría y calculada el genocidio de la tercera parte del pueblo judío.

Esta experiencia colectiva ha hecho al judío sumamente sensible a las cuestiones de los derechos humanos. Muchos de ellos han encabezado movimientos contemporáneos que propugnan por la igualdad del hombre y la justicia social. No es de extrañar, por lo tanto, que haya sido un judío el principal promotor de la Declaración Universal de los Derechos Humanos y que, el Holocausto, haya sido el elemento catalizador que ayudó a cristalizar este transcendental documento ya hace más de sesenta años.

A fines de 1948, los acontecimientos sin precedentes que se suscitaron dentro del contexto de la segunda guerra mundial permanecían latentes en la memoria de la humanidad. Diversos grupos cívicos de las fuerzas aliadas pugnaban porque se adoptaran medidas internacionales que coadyuvaran a salvaguardar los derechos del hombre. Con el derrumbe de las potencias que habían aspirado al dominio universal, muchas naciones en ruinas y pueblos inmersos en la miseria luchaban por vivir con dignidad. La Comisión de los Derechos Humanos de la recién constituida ONU, inició la elaboración de un documento en el que se consagrarían los derechos fundamentales del hombre y a donde se sentarían los principios para que las relaciones entre los pueblos fuesen regidas con justicia y respeto.

El presidente de la Comisión, René Cassin, jurista judío nacido en Bayonne, Francia en 1887, impulsó fuertemente la promulgación de la Declaración Universal de los Derechos Humanos. Desde 1924, después de la primera guerra mundial, Cassin se dedicó a luchar en contra de la injusticia. Fundó una asociación para inválidos de guerra y actuó como un destacado miembro de la resistencia, ocupando el cargo de comisionado para la justicia y la educación. Durante la segunda guerra mundial, muchos de sus familiares perecieron junto con los millones de judíos ejecutados por el aparato nazi. Como testigo de la crueldad humana llevada a su máxima expresión, se sintió especialmente responsable por la cruzada a favor de los derechos humanos que tuvo su culminación en la Declaración.

El diez de diciembre de 1948, la asamblea general de la ONU votó por el reconocimiento y el respeto de este documento histórico ante la actitud de reserva de algunos países del bloque comunista, ya que estos derechos cívicos y políticos resultaban incompatibles con ciertos regímenes autoritarios.

La Declaración constituye el ideal por el que todos los pueblos deben luchar: el amplio respeto a los derechos humanos y a la libertad, asegurando su aplicación universal y efectiva a través de medidas progresivas de carácter nacional e internacional.

Los antecedentes de esta Declaración los podemos encontrar en el Bill of Rights inglés, en la Declaración de Independencia de Estados Unidos y en la promulgación de la Declaración de los Derechos del Hombre defendidos en Francia en el siglo XVIII, todos los cuales se basaban en el concepto del hombre como poseedor de derechos absolutos e inalienables.

A pesar de que este documento es reciente, como concepción política, religiosa y moral, los derechos humanos son muy antiguos y se remontan más allá de los racionalistas franceses y de los colonialistas americanos. Podemos encontrar en la Biblia, por ejemplo, numerosas leyes, máximas y proverbios en donde se refleja la preocupación por los derechos inherentes a todo ser humano.

La idea central parte del libro de Génesis: “Y creó Dios al hombre a su imagen; varón y hembra los creó” (Génesis 1:27). De acuerdo a esta premisa, todo ser humano lleva en su esencia parte de la divinidad y mantiene así, un status de igualdad ante sus semejantes. De aquí se deriva también, que el hombre está dotado de atributos como el sentido de justicia y el libre albedrío, colocando al hombre fuera del determinismo divino.

A través de diversos recursos la Biblia enfatiza la esencia misma del judaísmo: “Amarás a tu prójimo como a ti mismo” (Levítico 19:18). Hillel, uno de los principales sabios judíos se explaya en este aspecto: “Lo que es malo para ti no lo hagas a tus semejantes. Esto es toda la Torá, lo demás es comentario”. (Shabbat, p. 312, Talmud Babli).

Es en la Biblia, también en donde encontramos los fundamentos morales del comportamiento humano con el propósito de preservar la justicia, la libertad y la paz, en el proceso de consolidación de una sociedad armónica. Los Diez Mandamientos (Exodo 20:1-7), pueden considerarse como una filosofía en sí mismos, que aseguran la convivencia entre los hombres a través de preceptos como el de “no matarás”, “no hurtarás”, “no codiciarás”, entre otros.

Estos postulados mantienen su vigencia y universalidad hasta la fecha. Sin embargo, considerando que las condiciones actuales son más complejas, se han tenido que concebir diversas legislaciones sobre derechos humanos que respondan a nuevas circunstancias y que se han visto enriquecidas por los conceptos morales que las anteceden.

En la Declaración se enumeran los derechos propios e inalienables de todo ser humano, los cuales deben ser respetados por todos los países que la suscriben.

A pesar de que en términos jurídicos este documento carece de normatividad, ha tenido un notable impacto moral. Su premisa básica es que todo hombre nace en condiciones de libertad e igualdad de derechos y que al estar dotado de raciocinio y de conciencia, debe buscar la convivencia con sus congéneres. De aquí se derivan las premisas de libertad de pensamiento y de conciencia, independientemente de raza, sexo o religión. Se atribuye, además, vital importancia al derecho de una vida libre y segura, y se subraya la unión esencial de la familia humana.

A más de sesenta años de su promulgación y a pesar de su reconocimiento universal, la humanidad continúa siendo testigo de múltiples casos de discriminación y persecución contra diversas minorías étnicas y religiosas.Día a día se violan los derechos humanos ante la inmovilidad de la comunidad internacional y más aún, con el apoyo de países soberanos que fomentan este flagelo en todos sus aspectos.

Sin embargo, a pesar de todo esto, la Declaración Universal de los Derechos Humanos representa sin lugar a duda un paso trascendental para garantizar la dignidad humana.

Segun tomado de, https://diariojudio.com/opinion/la-declaracion-universal-de-los-derechos-humanos-una-perspectiva-judia/315334/

La "dualidad" de Dios

La
por Alex Corcias

Un enfoque místico sobre las tendencias opuestas de la personalidad.


En artículos pasados hablamos sobre el desafío que enfrentamos todas las personas al tratar de vivir en paz y equilibrio con las fuerzas contrarias que habitan en nosotros. Todos nos vemos atraídos en cierta medida por una fuerza de orden y razón que nos da estructura y sentido, por un lado, y por otro lado, una fuerza totalmente diferente, de amor incondicional, creatividad y espontaneidad. Incluso se ha llegado a la conclusión de que cada una de estas tendencias están dirigidas por los dos hemisferios del cerebro (el cerebro izquierdo maneja la estructura rígida, mientras que el derecho la creatividad espontanea). Esta fascinante dualidad que existe en nuestras emociones y en nuestra personalidad, lejos de ser un trastorno, es lo que nos hace humanos y representa la base del trabajo de refinamiento de la personalidad y el carácter, sobre lo cual el judaísmo hace tanto hincapié.

¿Puede existir dualidad en Dios?

Rabí Moshé Jaim Luzzato, el “Ramjal” (1707-1747), en su libro Dérej Hashem, menciona y explica las fuerzas a través de las cuales el Creador mismo le da vida al mundo. Una de ellas, el din —expresada en los límites y el orden de la naturaleza— y la otra el rajamim —expresada en la misericordia y el amor ilimitado—. A estas alturas, es casi obligatorio empezar a relacionar las conductas de Dios del din y el rajamim, con las conductas que fluyen de aquellas dos tenencias en nuestra mente. Prestemos atención a la similitud que existe entre lo que llamamos “cerebro izquierdo” —con su orden y estructura— y la mencionada fuerza del din. Asimismo, veamos la similitud que existe entre lo que llamamos “cerebro derecho” —con su espontaneidad y amor incondicional— y la mencionada fuerza de rajamim. El paralelismo que existe entre estas conductas es realmente impresionante. La gran pregunta que surge es ¿Cómo coexisten estas dos conductas en la realidad de Dios, ¡si realmente Dios es uno!? A lo que los sabios del misticismo judío responden que realmente no existe dualidad en Dios, sino sólo para nuestro limitado entendimiento, pues incluso la justicia rigurosa de Dios, proviene de un profundo y absoluto amor puro.

Simple benevolencia

El Ramjal en su libro Mesilat Yesharim explica que Dios conduce el mundo con la cualidad de misericordia y amor (rajamim), pues, debido a la naturaleza animal del hombre, sería imposible conducir el mundo mediante la justicia estricta (din). Asimismo, en su libro Dérej Hashem el Ramjal enseña que todo el propósito de la creación es la manifestación absoluta de la benevolencia de Dios. Eso es en esencia todo lo que existe, solo la benevolencia, la generosidad, la gracia, el amor absoluto de Dios. Eso significa que, a fin de cuentas, la misericordia y el amor deben superar a la rigidez y el orden. Lo cual, no menosprecia el lugar de estas últimas, pues es claro que la naturaleza necesita reglas claras y ordenadas, sin embargo, eso es solo un medio y no el propósito final. Como las reglas de un juego, éstas no son el propósito final del juego, son más bien el medio que permite el desarrollo del juego mismo. El amor y la misericordia de Dios son la esencia de todo, pero el orden y la ley, son la infraestructura de la vida que nos permite funcionar en equilibrio. Eso significa, que en realidad, el din y el rajamim de Dios provienen de una misma fuente, la intención de Dios de dar y beneficiar a toda su creación.

La dualidad en la persona

Rabí Moshe Cordovero, el “Ramak” (1522 – 1577) enseña en su libro Tómer Devorá que la aspiración más grande que una persona debe tener en la vida es imitar las conductas de Dios para lograr parecerse a Él en su ámbito espiritual. Eso es una de las formas más simples de entender el concepto mencionado en Bereshit, de que el hombre fue creado a “imagen y semejanza” de Dios. Esa similitud, más allá del entendimiento físico, alude a una similitud espiritual cuya expresión física es la actitud y la personalidad. A la luz de lo estudiado, cabe preguntar en la vida de cada uno de nosotros, en dónde se enfrentan nuestras facetas de rigidez contra las de espontaneidad, ¿Cómo alcanzar un equilibrio óptimo? Y sobre todo ¿es posible aprenderlo o cada uno debe conformarse con su tendencia natural dominante? O sea, una persona cuya tendencia es actuar de forma rígida, ¿puede aprender a ser más espontánea y creativa? Y lo contrario, ¿una persona que actúa de forma demasiado espontanea, ¿puede aprender a vivir con más orden y estructura? ¡Por supuesto que sí!

Según tomado de, https://www.aishlatino.com/e/cp/La-dualidad-de-Dios.html?s=mfeat